More Than Just a Mood Swing: 5 Warning Signs of Hormonal Imbalance in Women

Hormones or healing superpowers?

Women can recover from injuries better than men, and it’s all thanks to female hormones. Studies show women are 14% more likely to survive an injury than men who have the same trauma. While male hormones will attack the immune system after an injury, female hormones strengthen immunity.

While female hormones can do a lot to make your life better, they can also work against you when they’re out of balance. Living with a hormonal imbalance means your body isn’t able to correctly send and receive messages. As a result, all sorts of uncomfortable symptoms can start to pop up.

Do you suspect your hormones aren’t quite right? The sooner you know, the faster you can do something to fix it. Read on to learn about 5 signs your hormones might be out of balance.

1. Digestive Issues

Have you ever noticed that right before your period you start to experience all sorts of symptoms that relate to your stomach? High estrogen levels can contribute to cramping, diarrhea, and bloating, and more.

A lot of hormonal imbalance symptoms, are things you experience because of your menstrual cycle. While it’s normal to experience a certain level of discomfort before your period, for some women it’s a constant struggle.

Throughout the entire month, imbalances in their estrogen levels, causing them to have problems digesting food normally. An imbalance in hormones can also contribute to irritable bowel syndrome.

2. Period Problems

The female body is used to having imbalances in the hormones throughout the month. For instance, when you finish your period, both estrogen and progesterone levels start to slowly rise.

When the estrogen levels are at the right height, your body releases an egg, in a process called ovulation. After the egg’s released estrogen levels start to go back down.

However, progesterone levels will continue to rise. The rise in progesterone is to help prepare your body for the fertilization of your egg. Once your body realizes you’re not conceiving, it’ll start to rapidly lower your progesterone levels.

Natural hormonal shifts that accompany a period usually begin around this time. Symptoms like irritability, or mood swings, are normal to experience at varying degrees.

However, when the symptoms are so extreme they make it impossible to lead a normal life, it could be a sign of a hormonal balance. Another red flag that your hormones are off-balance is if your period is painful, or heavier than usual.

As you begin to understand the connection between your hormones and period, you’ll be able to find out more about what type of imbalance you’re dealing with. For instance, acne or excess facial hair can both accompany a spike in the hormone testosterone.

Whereas someone who has excess progesterone levels may feel sad and emotional. Finally, high estrogen levels usually result in fluid retention, and feelings of anger.

3. Extreme Hair Loss

For both men and women, it’s the hormone dihydrotestosterone (DHT) that’s responsible for hair loss. DHT is a good hormone that your body produces as a by-product of testosterone.

When your DHT levels are too high, it can cause your hair follicles to start to shrink. As the follicles become smaller, the life cycle of each hair strand becomes shorter. Your hair may start to become brittle and thin, and it’ll fall out much faster than it normally does.

To make matters worse, high levels of DHT can also make it difficult for your body to grow new hair to replace the old hair. When women experience hair loss from a hormonal imbalance of DHT, it’s called androgenic alopecia. It’s one of the most severe kinds of hair loss since once the follicles shrink, you can lose hair areas permanently.

You may have noticed that for men, hair loss tends to follow a U-shaped pattern, or the hair loss occurs along a receding hairline. For women, the hair loss will occur differently, making the hair thinner across your entire scalp.

4. Female Infertility

Have you been trying to have a baby for a few months, but still nothing? An imbalance in your hormones could be interrupting the ovulation process.

Since hormones are chemicals your body uses to send messages, an imbalance can send the wrong messages to your reproductive system. Along with disrupting ovulation, the hormones could also be telling your body to not produce a thickened uterine lining.

Causes of Hormonal Imbalance

There’s a variety of health conditions that can imbalance hormones, resulting in infertility. For instance, polycystic ovarian syndrome is a reproductive condition that can cause an imbalance in hormones.

Women who have this condition have increased production of male hormones making it impossible for their bodies to ovulate properly.

5. Trouble Sleeping

If you’re tossing and turning at night, you’re estrogen and progesterone levels may bee too low. Both estrogen and progesterone work together to help promote a good night’s rest.

During the perimenopause, and menopause stage of a woman’s life, their ovaries start producing less of these 2 hormones. The lower levels can make sleeping through the night difficult, if not impossible!

On top of not being able to fall asleep, night sweats also commonly accompany low estrogen levels. Getting a diagnosis from a doctor is the first step towards restoring your estrogen and progesterone levels to normal.

Tips to Help You Sleep

While you wait for your body to rebalance, you can start taking steps to help you sleep at night. Try using cotton sheets and wearing cotton pajamas to help you combat hot flashes and night sweats.

You should also put up blackout curtains over your windows to help make your room as dark and cold as possible. Finally, cutting back on caffeine and alcohol can also help.

Hormonal Imbalance Diagnosis

Are you dealing with any of the hormonal imbalance symptoms listed in our article? If yes, go ahead and reach out to your doctor today to explore your options.

Before you know it, you can be back to feeling like yourself again! For more ways to feel great, check out the rest of this site.


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